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How bizarre! How bizarre!
by Thanos Kalamidas
2013-01-13 10:04:32
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Stolen Matisse recovered

bar001A stolen Henri Matisse painting, valued at $1m (£620,000) has been found by an art recovery specialist in London. Le Jardin, or The Garden, was taken from the Museum of Modern Art in Stockholm during a robbery in the early hours of 11 May, 1987. According to reports at the time, attempts were made to sell it back to the museum for exorbitant sums.

The recovery came after an art dealer in Essex was offered the painting by a Polish collector just before Christmas.  Before handling the work, Charles Roberts, of Charles Fine Art, made a search of the Art Loss Register (ALR), a database of stolen, missing and looted artwork.

Once the match was confirmed, the recovery was handed to ALR director Christopher Marinello, who successfully negotiated the return of the painting, after convincing the individual concerned to release it to the UK. "No payments were made, no arms were broken," Mr Marinello said. The French Impressionist painting is now being held in a safe. It will be handed to the Swedish Ministry of Culture for its return to Stockholm in the coming weeks.

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Cat 'arrested' for break-in

bar002_400A cat has been detained in the grounds of a jail in Brazil with contraband goods for prisoners strapped to its body with tape. The white cat was apprehended crossing the main prison gate. The incident took place at a jail in Arapiraca city, 250km (155 miles) south-west of Recife in Alagoas state.

The confiscated items included drill bits, files, a mobile phone and charger, plus earphones. The cat was taken to a local animal centre. The jail holds some 263 prisoners. A prison spokesperson was quoted by local paper Estado de S. Paulo as saying: "It's tough to find out who's responsible for the action as the cat doesn't speak."

Officials said the items could be used to affect a means of escape or for communicating with criminals on the outside. The incident took place at New Year, but the photo has only recently been released.

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Woman arrested for stalking herself

Police say a 34-year-old Crowley woman they arrested tried to convince investigators that her estranged boyfriend was sending her threatening text messages. Trudy Miller was arrested Tuesday on one count of false swearing for violation of health or safety, a felony charge. Crowley Chief of Police K.P. Gibson says Miller was believed to be the victim of stalking about five weeks ago when she filed her first complaint.

But after charges were filed, Gibson said Miller's former boyfriend repeatedly said he didn't own the cellphone from which the threatening texts were sent. After further investigation, Gibson says detectives found that Miller was in possession of the cellphone being used to send her threatening text messages. It was unclear whether Miller has an attorney.

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Wildfires Caused Hay-Bale Theft

bar004_400Economics says that, all else being equal, when the supply of something goes down, the price should go up. That's exactly what has been happening with hay in drought and wildfire-afflicted areas of the United States. In fact, many aren't ready for fork up the extra cash, or they simply can't locate a seller, because there's been a big resurgence of hay bale thefts. "Sheriffs in rural counties in Colorado, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Kansas say the spike in hay thefts is part of a broader rise in agricultural crime," writes the New York Times. It's not the most heinous crime out there by a long shot, but it affects the lives of many farmers and it's a symptom of the kind of extreme weather we've been experiencing. And on a warming planet, we should expect more...

California’s farmers have grappled recently with growing thefts of grapes, beehives and avocados, and sheriffs say high prices of scrap metal have made agricultural machinery — whether it works or not — an appealing target. Dubious online merchants are selling feed to farmers but never delivering. On the range, wire fences are being clipped to allow interloping herds to poach grazing land. Most thieves make off with less than a ton of hay — about $200 to $300 worth, depending on the quality. But on Labour Day in Wellington, Colo., thieves hot-wired a front-end loader and stole enough hay from Conrad T. Swanson’s ranch to fill the flatbed trailer of a semi.

In some areas it's serious enough that a sheriff in Tillman County, Okla., put a GPS-tracking device in a bale in a field particularly prone to thefts. The trick actually worked and the thieves were caught red-handed, but it's not exactly practical to track all hay bales with GPS, so until then, farmers will have to hope for a more cooperative weather.

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Man wins fishing contest with fish stolen from aquarium

bar005A man has claimed first prize in a fishing contest with a fish he stole from the local aquarium in Guernsey. Matthew Clark, 29, placed first at the Bailiwick Bass Club Open Competition after entering with a giant bass weighing 13lb 13oz; beating the runner-up who managed 10lb 3oz. Clark claimed the £800 prize and posed with the winning fish. However, he was caught out when competitor Shane Bentley thought he had seen the bass elsewhere.

According to The Mirror, Bentley said: "My wife and I took the kids to the aquarium and saw the bass in the tank. It stood out because it had some very distinct markings on its head. "Next morning, I went to the aquarium and asked to see the bass with the markings. But neither myself nor the owner could find it anywhere."

Contest organisers and the police were then informed, by which time Clark had sold the fish to a fishmonger. Police identified the stolen bass by matching the fish carcass to the missing fish. Clark has since been sentenced to 100 hours of community service after admitting burglary and fraud.


    
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Eva2013-01-13 10:45:09
The fish story, truly BIZARRE, and oh my, the lengths they went for the truth, obviously fishing is very serious business, hahahahahahaha!


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