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Cancer In Yemen in need revaluation Cancer In Yemen in need revaluation
by Abdullah A. Ali Sallam
2013-01-03 11:04:13
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In the last two years and since the Arab spring, more than 12,000 died in the Arab region. The same number of people died without revaluation in Yemen and the killer is Cancer.

In Yemen, cancer is called “the silent killer” because majority of patients are waiting to die without fight. Around 12,000 Yemenis die of cancer every year which means that 34 person die every day. While there are some 22,000 people suffer from different forms of the aggressive disease, according to experts across Yemen. This is a frightening number and it is growing fast and spreading among all ages and genders: i.e. children, adults, young and old, men and women.

Cancer is one of the major health problems worldwide with increasing frequency. Parts of the causes are exposure to radiation and the predisposition to large number of carcinogenic agents.

Despite the size of this problem the government in Yemen has done very little for fighting cancer. There is only one government oncology centre. Yemen health services cannot simply cope with the increasing number of patients. Patients have complained that they have to wait often for hours at the Sana’a National Oncology Centre before receiving their treatments whether radiotherapy or chemotherapy. There are stretched lines to the limit that doctors have to push hard to get through the long lines of patients. They also have to often rush through patient care to get to their next case.

Farmers use dangerous and powerful pesticides on vegetables, fruit and Qat (a leafy narcotic popular in certain areas of Africa and Yemen) to prevent diseases and parasites from contaminating their crops. Most of these pesticides are actually banned in most countries as they pose a danger for humans and can cause cancer.

Yemen suffers long power blackouts which have forced many households and privately owned businesses to use small and mid-sized diesel generators to light their homes and keep electrical appliances running. However, this solution to the power cuts has come at the expense of people's health and the environment, according to environmentalists and physicians. Electricity generators cause emissions that can also cause many health problems and complications that result to cancer and other diseases. Furthermore, there are more than 200 persons died directly from the misuse of the electricity generators.

On other hand, poverty and malnutrition play big role in the spread of cancer. People infected with cancer are waiting to die because they can’t afford the costs of cancer treatment (Total expenditures on health care in Yemen constituted less 3.7 percent of gross domestic product).

In a country where nearly half of the citizens live in less than two dollars a day, Yemenis the only Arab country to rank on the United Nation’s list of LDC’s (Least Developed Countries) and is currently ranked as the 161 poorest country in the world.

In addition, people in Yemen use plastic bags with everything they buy. One can notice the plastic bags are everywhere. People think that using the plastic bags is not a problem because of their weak awareness about cancer causes. Also they like using cheap things which end up finding themselves affected in many diseases and one of them is cancer. It is a fact that wherever you go see plastic, you find cancer.

Although it has been proven and beyond any doubt that smoking and using other kinds of tobacco cause cancer, smokers in Yemen somehow think they will elude this fact. They continue to puff their cigarettes, suck in smoke from shishas, and stick powdery tobacco in their lips. 

Indeed, there are several cancer causes in Yemen but the big problem is ignorance and poverty; Ignorance on how to save their life, how to be healthy, and how to feel the beauty around their lives.

Interestingly and despite of its existence, there is one Initiative to fight cancer that is the National Cancer Control Foundation (NCCF)which is considered one of the best organization in Yemen that provides services for cancer patients and has 4 centres distributed in main cities. This organization has many activities for cancer patients but the Ministry of Health, as always, talks about NCCF’s problems but not its successes.

We have the power to reduce cancer rates in this country with a few simple changes to our personal attitudes. If everyone stops smoking and tobacco use, health care costs in this country would be drastically reduced—and we’d enjoy life for a few years longer.


     
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Abeer Mohamed2013-01-04 04:29:59
It's right and also there are many diseases spread in Yemen more over cancer ,one of them in my opinion is chewing Qat I think it is big problem in Yemen


healthy man2013-01-04 09:40:25
WELL SAID.. I went through this easy and I realized that nothing is perfect more than you be in good health


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