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Skydive for cancer: The aftermath Skydive for cancer: The aftermath
by Tony Butcher
2006-10-20 10:25:23
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Last weekend I had the experience of a lifetime. So many people that I spoke to in the lead up to my Skydive said it was something they would never do - do not be so quick to rule it out too.

skydive_fall_400I arrived early at RAF Weston-on-the-Green, near Bicester, and immediately you could see how popular this sport is. I was one of around forty people there on the day doing a whole variety of Skydives and parachute jumps. The weather was perfect; clear blue skies and a breath of wind, with beautiful autumn sunshine greeting us in Oxfordshire.

From the moment our briefing began, you were assured of safety and professionalism; the 'tandem masters' clearly knew their job and ran through the entire set-up for the day. I went up on the third jump plane and we quickly ascended to 13,000 feet (4,000m).

I was strapped to my master, Andy, and, before you knew it, we were hanging out of the aeroplane door looking down at terra firma whipping past. I had my cameraman, another Andy, ready and the photos and video he took were simply amazing (check out the links at the end).

Trying to explain the feeling of falling is very difficult. It's not like when you might have fallen from a tree or off a ladder. You are not consciously aware of the ground rushing up towards you and, at no point before or during the jump, did I feel fear. The adrenalin rush was simply awesome.

It was unlike anything I had experienced before. It is just 100% pure enjoyment and ecstasy. At work in the city, you get a huge adrenalin rush when market moving news comes out or if you're putting on a great position. However, there is uncertainty and fear mixed into that and you have to think constantly about the changing scenarios - here you could breathe in the experience and savour its delights for 8,000 feet (2,400m) of freefall.

One day someone may give you the opportunity to Skydive, hopefully you will seek out the chance yourself. You will never forget it and, like me, find it hard to explain exactly what you feel, but when you meet someone who has also had the experience you will both have a knowing smile that will say it all.

As many of you will know, the reason I was up in that plane was for charity, a Cancer support group called Cancer Backup . I exceeded my £1000 (1500€) sponsorship target and I want to thank everyone who helped me achieve that; I have been truly humbled by the generosity and good wishes I got from family, friends and complete strangers.

The reaction of some amazing individuals, when they were speaking to me after the event, to increase their sponsorship has left me overwhelmed by their kindness and generosity. Thank you seems such a tame expression when you want to express what is in your heart, but thank you so very much.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO OF THE SKYDIVE


   
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Asa2006-10-19 10:23:49
Top marks, lil bro!

However, it will take you a long time to live down those goggles, helmet and jumpsuit...kinky!


Thanos2006-10-19 20:50:26
you are a hero kid!!!


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