Ovi -
we cover every issue
newsletterNewsletter
subscribeSubscribe
contactContact
searchSearch
Philosophy Books  
Ovi Bookshop - Free Ebook
Ovi Greece
Ovi Language
George Kalatzis - A Family Story 1924-1967
Stop violence against women
Tony Zuvela - Cartoons, Illustrations
Stop human trafficking
 
BBC News :   - 
iBite :   - 
GermanGreekEnglishSpanishFinnishFrenchItalianPortugueseSwedish
Romanian report Romanian report
by Euro Reporter
2012-03-01 07:43:14
Print - Comment - Send to a Friend - More from this Author
DeliciousRedditFacebookDigg! StumbleUpon
Romania warns Serbia on minority rights

Romania threatened on Tuesday to derail European Union plans to grant Serbia membership candidate status in a row over minority rights in the former Yugoslav state, EU diplomats said. French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said on Monday EU governments were ready to agree to make Serbia an official EU candidate, in recognition of its democratic reforms, its capture of war crime fugitives and improved relations with neighbouring Kosovo.

But at a meeting of EU foreign ministers in Brussels on Tuesday, the Romanian delegation unexpectedly refused to sign the agreement, demanding guarantees that the rights of a small group of ethnic Romanians in Serbia be better protected. Bucharest said it wanted to hold a debate on the issue at a summit of EU heads of state and government on Thursday and Friday, which had initially been expected to formally approve Serbia's new status, diplomats said. "Romania wants to postpone the talks until the summit, but others don't agree and will try to resolve the problem today," Dutch Foreign Minister Uri Rosenthal told reporters on the sidelines of the meeting.

There are about 30,000 ethnic Romanians living in Serbia. Some members of the 40,000-strong ethnic Vlach community consider themselves to be Romanian as well, while other Vlachs think of themselves as Serb. Romanian President Traian Basescu said late last year that Serbia should grant ethnic Romanians living on its territory the right to education in the Romanian language and access to services in Romanian Orthodox churches. One EU diplomat, familiar with Tuesday's talks, said last-minute diplomacy might still persuade Romania to agree to give Serbia candidate status. "Our hope is that they are going to give ground. At this stage all big member states are working towards an agreement and it's only Romania that's holding out," he said.

*****************************************************************

Romania to accept dollar bonds


Romania’s central bank said it will accept dollar-denominated bonds sold by Romania on international markets this year as collateral in open-market and monetary policy operations starting March 1. The Banca Nationala a Romaniei will accept $2.25 billion in dollar-denominated bonds sold on Jan. 31 and Feb. 28, the Bucharest-based bank said today in an e-mailed statement.
 
“The haircut level, the margin deducted from the market value of eligible assets to obtain the adjusted value thereof, applicable to the above mentioned securities will be 9 percent for central bank operations with maximum one month maturity,” the bank said in the statement.

*****************************************************************

One in 19 Romanians has a rare disease, most don’t get proper diagnosis


Over a million of Romania’s 19 million inhabitants have a rare disease, and three quarters of them are children. Most of the diseases are early onset genetic disorders, according to data from the National Alliance for Rare Diseases in Romania. Every day, at least one Romanian thought to have a rare disease gets admitted to the hospital. Statistics show nine out of ten Romanians don’t get the adequate treatment as they are not diagnosed correctly or because they are diagnosed too late. Romania has only 75 specialists in genetics, and most of the country’s counties don’t have any. Similarly to elsewhere in the world, the country lacks rare disease research centers.

Rare diseases appear at 3 to 4 percent of births, according to the European Commission statistics. The bulk of rare diseases are inherited – 80 percent, but they can also be autoimmune, metabolic, toxic and infectious diseases, leukemia or other rare cancers.




     
Print - Comment - Send to a Friend - More from this Author

Comments(0)
Get it off your chest
Name:
Comment:
 (comments policy)

© Copyright CHAMELEON PROJECT Tmi 2005-2008  -  Sitemap  -  Add to favourites  -  Link to Ovi
Privacy Policy  -  Contact  -  RSS Feeds  -  Search  -  Submissions  -  Subscribe  -  About Ovi