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How bizarre How bizarre
by Thanos Kalamidas
2011-05-29 10:33:37
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Harold Camping issues new apocalypse date

bizarre01_400_08The evangelical broadcaster who left followers crestfallen by his failed prediction that last Saturday would be Judgement Day says he miscalculated. Harold Camping said it had "dawned" on him that God would spare humanity "hell on Earth for five months" and the apocalypse would happen on 21 October. Mr Camping said he felt "terrible" about his mistake.

But he said he could not give financial advice to those who spent their life savings in the belief the end was nigh. Mr Camping had predicted that on 21 May, true believers would be swept up to heaven while a giant earthquake would bring destruction for those left behind. His independent ministry, Family Radio International, spent millions of dollars on broadcasts, billboards and campaign vehicles to publicise the prediction.

Some followers donated their life savings or simply gave away their worldly possessions as the day approached. Many expressed bewilderment and shock as the day came and went with no sign of the global cataclysm. "I've been mocked and scoffed and cursed at," said Jeff Hopkins, a retired TV producer in New York State who spent some of his savings customising his car to showcase Mr Camping's warning.

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Salt Lake man sues trooper who used Taser in DUI stop


bizarre02_400_10A Salt Lake man has filed a lawsuit in federal court against a Utah Highway Patrol trooper he feels violated his constitutional rights after twice deploying a Taser when he refused to take a breathalyzer test. Ryan Wesley Jones, 26, is suing UHP Cpl. Lisa Steed in both her professional and individual capacity for the March 28, 2009, incident.

According to the lawsuit filed Friday in U.S. District Court, Jones and a passenger were pulled over by Steed. She asked Jones for his driver’s license, vehicle registration and proof of insurance coverage and verified that all were valid, the lawsuit states.

"(Steed) told (Jones) that she smelled alcohol in the vehicle, 'wanted to make sure it wasn’t coming from (plaintiff)' and asked plaintiff to blow into the machine," the lawsuit states. "In response, (Jones), still seated in the vehicle with the door closed, said 'I would like to speak to my lawyer before I take any tests.'”  The lawsuit claims Steed pulled out her Taser and threatened to shock Jones if he didn't exit the vehicle.

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A fire burns at the campgrounds


bizarre03_11Fans jokingly called it the "Royal Race Wedding" because of all the camera-toting, microphone-waving reporters who showed up at Charlotte Motor Speedway to cover the ceremony. The track even sent a security guard for crowd control.

And when it was all done - after race fans Linda Ward and Greg Waters had exchanged vows at the track's Peninsula Campground - they were whisked around on a decorated golf cart to wave at well-wishers. That was royal enough for a truck driver from Virginia and a nurse at the Iredell County Jail, who met 12 months ago to the very day while camping opposite each other at the track.

"It's everything I imagined," said the gushing bride, who wore an embroidered sun dress purchased at a Cherokee, N.C., and souvenir shop. "I tried not to cry," added the groom, who wore shorts and a tan shirt. "But I teared up because she's such a special woman."

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Rap about dealing prescription drugs on YouTube


bizarre04_08It’s no secret that YouTube has been a boon to young, struggling musicians looking to make a name for themselves, providing the opportunity to showcase talents to and from any point on the globe, eliminating, or at least lessening, the need for geographical proximity to the music industry’s kingmakers. With that said, it appears that YouTube can also land young struggling musicians in jail when the material they upload can be used to incriminate them in court.

Such is the plight of Clyde Smith, aka “Tattoo Face” and “G-Red,” of the Houma, Louisiana based rap outfit, The Rico Gang, who apparently has been earning a living dealing prescription drugs, and rapped about it in homemade videos posted to YouTube.

“Another trip to Texas … we going doctor shopping,” he raps. “I’m Dominoes, I’m Pizza Hut. Call your nigga up because you know I deliver.”


    
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Emanuel Paparella2011-05-29 12:35:03
On the Camping story: the definition of insanity is to keep on doing the same thing in the face of evidence that it will not work. The media too exemplifies some of tha insanity when they keep on covering a the same insane story and enabling the insane to keep on doing what they are doing and even profiting from it.


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