Ovi -
we cover every issue
newsletterNewsletter
subscribeSubscribe
contactContact
searchSearch
Μονοπάτι της Εκεχειρίας  
Ovi Bookshop - Free Ebook
Tony Zuvela - Cartoons, Illustrations
Ovi Language
Murray Hunter: Essential Oils: Art, Agriculture, Science, Industry and Entrepreneurship
The Breast Cancer Site
Tony Zuvela - Cartoons, Illustrations
Stop human trafficking
 
BBC News :   - 
iBite :   - 
GermanGreekEnglishSpanishFinnishFrenchItalianPortugueseSwedish
Slovakian report Slovakian report
by Euro Reporter
2011-05-22 10:15:39
Print - Comment - Send to a Friend - More from this Author
DeliciousRedditFacebookDigg! StumbleUpon
Another wall separating Roma from non-Roma planned

Yet another wall is evidently being planned in Slovakia to separate the Roma community from other nearby residents. The town of Vrútky in the north of the country wants to resolve tension between local Roma and non-Roma living in neighboring housing units. Similar constructions have grown up in many towns and villages, particularly in the east of the country. "We will build a new concrete fence between the nursery school and the Roma community and another near the housing units to eliminate noise and reduce the nervousness of the people living there," the Slovak daily Pravda quoted Milan Mazúr, chief magistrate of the town, as saying. He is not concerned about criticism over separating citizens from one another. "This is not segregation. The citizens demanded this for their own security," he said.

The daily reports that more Roma people started residing on one of the town's streets after housing units once used for railway workers near the local railway station were torn down. In the new locality more than 200 people are now cooped up in about five cottages and three one-room temporary construction shelters. "It's a problematic place where Roma from other parts of the republic are grouped together, particularly from the east," Mazúr noted.

Other housing units, the nursery school, and the retirement home are all located adjacent to the locality. Many retirees have complained that the Roma foul up the street beneath their windows or spit and swear at them. The Roma community has criticized the prepared construction of the two-meter high wall. Similar walls, which Roma organizations have previously labeled a manifestation of segregation, have grown up in the villages of Ostrovany, Lomnička, Šečovce, Trebišov, and Michalovec. Several hundred thousand Roma people are estimated to live in Slovakia, but only some of them have officially registered their ethnicity. Slovakia has not yet managed to cope with settlements where many Roma people live in disadvantageous hygienic conditions.

**************************************

Cabinet acknowledges action plan to counter terrorism


The terrorist threat to Slovakia may be assessed on a special scale in future. A new National Action Plan for the Fight against Terrorism for 2011-2014 projects implementation of such a mechanism, the SITA newswire reported. The material, tailored by the Interior Ministry and passed by the cabinet on Wednesday, May 18, assumes the launch of a mechanism for the assessment of the terrorist threat at the national level and its implementation in December 2012. By the end of this year, the need and possibility for the establishment of a post of national coordinator to fight terrorism in Slovakia should be evaluated.

The terrorist threat scale is a common practice used in several European countries, the US and Canada as well as at international organizations like NATO and the European Union. According to the proposal, the Slovak Information Service (SIS), Slovakia's main intelligence agency, should set up an anti-terrorist centre with a nationwide force some time before December 2012.

The proposed measures also include intensifying efforts to eliminate the illegal trade in military materials, establishing effective regulations for freezing the financial resources and assets of terrorists, and securing the presence of at least one bomb disposal expert at the workplaces of the Criminal and Expertise Institute outside working hours.

**************************************

Cabinet approves overhaul of Slovakia’s tax and levy system


The much-debated changes to Slovakia’s system of taxes and mandatory payroll levies were approved by the coalition cabinet at its session on May 18. The measures include a so-called super-gross salary and reduction in payroll levies for social insurance programs and health insurance for some employees. The tax-exempt base is also proposed to be reduced from 19.2 times the minimum subsistence level to 18 times. In monetary terms, this means the tax-free base would be €200 less in 2012. The mandatory health-care levy is proposed at 9 percent, except for the disabled who would pay half the rate. The proposed social insurance levy is 19 percent for employees, 13 percent for self-employed persons and 10 percent for people working via work contracts, TASR wrote.

The coalition partners agreed on a gradual reduction of the payroll levy burden on regular employees by 4 percentage points over four years, the SITA newswire wrote. According to the finance ministry, as quoted by TASR, the set of measures will have an unfavourable impact on public finances, with a loss of €59.9 million projected for next year. A total of 99.5 percent of employees are expected to be better-off due to the changes, the finance ministry said, adding that the same is true for self-employed with annual incomes up to €4,823 before tax and levies, which would cover 116,600 individuals.

However, the changes will take more from self-employed people who earn more than that amount and their number is projected to be 180,400. A total of 8,300 high-income employees will also see their take-home incomes reduced, along with individuals working via work-performance agreements. The Sme daily reported that the Civic Conservative Party (OKS), whose four MPs sit in the parliamentary caucus of Most-Híd, is not in total agreement with some provisions of the proposal and they are ready to make challenges in parliament. Anton Marcinčin, an MP from the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), also said he was not happy with the draft, Sme wrote.


       
Print - Comment - Send to a Friend - More from this Author

Comments(0)
Get it off your chest
Name:
Comment:
 (comments policy)

© Copyright CHAMELEON PROJECT Tmi 2005-2008  -  Sitemap  -  Add to favourites  -  Link to Ovi
Privacy Policy  -  Contact  -  RSS Feeds  -  Search  -  Submissions  -  Subscribe  -  About Ovi