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Dutch report Dutch report
by Euro Reporter
2011-03-22 09:38:13
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Dutch woman, 63, gives birth: New country record

A 63-year-old Dutch woman gave birth to a daughter on Monday, becoming the oldest-ever new mother in the Netherlands, the hospital and news reports said. "Baby Meagan was born at the Medical Centre Leeuwarden at 9:48 am (0848 GMT) on March 21," said a statement on the website of the hospital in the northern Dutch province of Friesland. "Meagan is the daughter of Tineke Geessink, a 63-year-old woman from Harlingen."

The girl was born with the aid of Caesarian section, said the statement, adding: "Both mother and daughter are fine". Dutch media reports said Geessink was the oldest-ever Dutch woman to become a mother. "It is a feeling that I have had for so long", to have a child, the woman told Dutch public radio, NOS.

"At some point there was something inside me saying: 'It is now or never’ and I decided to try everything possible to see if it is still possible." The NOS said the woman got pregnant through a foreign sperm donor as Dutch fertility doctors would not help her due to her age. "There is no guarantee that if you have a child at a young age you will see your child grows up," Geessink, a single mother, told the radio. "Of course, the risk with me is bigger. And whether the child will find it nice to have such an old mother . . . I hope that she loves me so much that she will just be glad to have me."

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Dutch wait for Nato on Libya


The Netherlands will not get involved in international efforts to restore order in Libya until formally requested to do so by Nato, foreign minister Uri Rosenthal confirmed on Monday. Rosenthal expects Nato agreement within a few hours, at which point a request for Dutch help could follow, he is quoted as saying by news agency ANP. Nato 'is the structure which we work in', Rosenthal said.

Spain and Norway have since joined Britain, the US and France in their operation in Libya, named Odessy Dawn.  The Dutch minesweeper HMS Haarlem is in the Mediterranean Sea at the moment on normal exercises, the paper said.  A poll by Maurice de Hond at the weekend shows 55% of the Dutch think the Netherlands should be involved in the bombing of Libya while 35% is opposed.

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Dutch seaman jailed for making bomb threat on plane


A Dutch seaman was sentenced on Monday to 16 months' jail after making a bomb threat on a Singapore Airlines plane on September 29 last year. Thirty-seven-year-old Eduard Gerard Jacobus also kicked a flight steward in the groin after he was asked to sit down while the Perth-bound SQ 223 was taxiing on a Changi Airport runway at around 10am that day. The court heard that a very drunk Jacobus claimed that he was a terrorist and threatened to blow up the plane.

As a result, the aircraft returned to the departure gate and passengers had to disembark for another round of screening. The plane also had to go through another round of security sweep. It only left some four hours later. For making the bomb threat, Jacobus could have been jailed up to five years, fined a maximum of S$100,000 or both. And for assaulting the flight attendant, he could have been jailed up to two years, fined a maximum of S$5,000 or both.

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Wi-Fi 'hacking' is not a crime


A Dutch court has ruled that hacking into Wi-Fi connections is not a crime providing any connected computers remain untouched. However Wi-Fi freeloaders would still lay themselves open to civil proceedings. The unusual ruling came in the case of a student who threatened a shooting rampage against staff at students at Maerlant College in The Hague. The threat was posted on 4chan, the notoriously anarchic internet image board, after the student broke into a secure Wi-Fi connection. The unnamed student was caught and convicted of posting the message but acquitted on the hacking charge. The miscreant was sentenced to 120 hours of community service.

Reports are vague on how the student hacker was tracked down, but it may well be that the denizens of 4chan got the ball rolling by reporting the threats to police, something that happened in a similar school massacre threat case in Michigan back in February. The Netherlands has a computer hacking law that dates from the early 1990s and defines a computer as a machine involved in the "storage, processing and transmission of data". Since a router is not used to store data, a judge reasoned, it fails to qualify as a computer – and thus the computer hacking law isn't applicable. The ruling, which surprised legal observers in The Netherlands, means that piggy-backing (or leeching) open wireless networks is not a crime: though civil proceedings against leechers would still be possible, so a free-for-all is unlikely.

Most countries have laws the apply to hacking into computer networks as well as computers but not, it would seem, The Netherlands. The Dutch attorney general has decided to appeal the verdict in the case, a process that may take several months.


        
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