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Slovenian report Slovenian report
by Euro Reporter
2009-03-18 08:27:37
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Protect Slovenian Skies

Italian military aircraft will defend Slovenia's airspace in NATO, the Defence Ministry has announced, putting an end to speculation over which country's planes would protect Slovenian skies. Having no military jets of its own, Slovenia asked for NATO support in policing its airspace after the country enters the alliance next week.


As the ministry explained in a press release, Italy was the only country to offer the necessary aircraft for the job, which is why Italian aircraft will police Slovenian airspace under the command of General James Jones, NATO's Supreme Allied Commander for Europe. Air policing will begin as early as next Monday, the day that Slovenia is set to join NATO. By becoming a NATO member, Slovenia will be incorporated into the alliance's air defence system, NATINEADS, the ministry stressed. The announcement comes a day after Slovenia's government adopted regulations on air policing, envisaging that allied countries will participate in protecting the country's airspace.

What about the …missiles?

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Mass Grave Uncovered

Forensics have uncovered the remains of several hundred people suspected to have been killed after World War II in a disused mine in the Lasko municipality, in the east of the country. The location was examined at the request of the Government Commission for Concealed Graves, which suspected that it was a mass grave stemming from the period immediately after World War II.

Forensics managed to break through the thick layer of concrete on Tuesday to uncover mummified remains of what they think is several hundred people, police said in a statement. The case has been handed to a police task force in charge of investigating post-WWII killings in Slovenia. Thousands of people are thought to have been killed in summary executions by Communist forces after World War II for their supposed links to the occupiers and opposition to newly-established Communist rule.

If confirmed as a site of remains of people killed in the immediate aftermath of World War II, it would become one of several hundred such mass graves in Slovenia. The former chair of the Government Commission for Concealed Graves Joze Dezman recently told STA that some 600 grave sites have been discovered. Dezman said that the latest figures suggest that some 100,000 people were killed, of which some 15,000 were Slovenians, tens of thousands Croatians, over 10,000 German POWs and over 10,000 Serbians and Montenegrins. Dezman called it "the biggest killing of unarmed people after World War II in Europe".

The sad results of a forced rule on a country!

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Corruption Threat

Slovenia's corruption tsar warned the National Assembly on Wednesday that Slovenia faced an increasing threat of corruption, the reasons being "active creation of conditions for development of systemic corruption, deliberate undermining of the public office holder wealth monitoring system and evasion of responsibility on the part of officials".

Presenting the Corruption Prevention Commission's work in 2007, its boss Drago Kos told MPs that the year saw a rise in the number of reported alleged acts of corruption to 595. "This shows people are more sensitive in detecting various irregularities in our society," Kos noted, but added that at the same time polls indicated people's confidence in law-enforcement authorities was diminishing.

Surveys show that an increasing number of people tend not to report corruption, either out of fear of inviting revenge or because they do not think their reports will be investigated, Kos explained in his address to parliament.

Corruption? What’s that?

   
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