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by Euro Reporter
2008-08-12 09:13:52
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More wiretapping?

The Finnish police should be given wider wiretapping powers, in an article in the Finnish daily Helsingin Sanomat an Interior Ministry working group says that has proposed that criminal investigators be given the right to eavesdrop on phone calls suspected of organizing illegal entry into the country.


The newspaper article mentions that the Interior Ministry is also considering allowing Finnish Border Guards the power to listen in to certain calls suspected of criminal intent and identifying their call details.

To cross the line between legality and illegality is very thin and the already laws guarantee that nobody will cross the line and they are enough to do the work. Who can guarantee that the person who’s eavesdropping will not use the case for personal reasons even for a blackmail and why for them to have the liberty to do that with whoever they like without all the safety keys the constitution and in extent the laws have put? Will it be enough for somebody to call me terrorist just because he doesn’t like my face for the police to wiretap my telephone?

These are characteristics of dictatorial regimes and Finland is obliged to be really careful when it comes to suggestions like that.

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Teaching in …Chinese


About 20 elementary school pupils will attend classes primarily in Chinese at a school in Helsinki. Meanwhile, about one third of first graders at the Meilahti School have chosen Mandarin as their first foreign language.

In order to study regular subjects in Chinese, students must have a basic grasp of the language. Most of those taking part were chosen last spring, and the last ones on Friday. The younger children had oral tests, while the older ones took written tests to qualify.

Those participating include children with one or two Chinese parents, Finns who have lived in China, and Chinese children who have been adopted by Finnish families.

It's remarkable the increase of the number of foreigners in Helsinki and equally remarkable the will of the Finnish state to create a multicultural society, the only hope it is that the Finnish society will follow since incidents of xenophobia becoming more often.

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Cutting transportation cost in Helsinki


Helsinki city plans to cut public transport costs after receiving additional government funding next year. In 2009, Helsinki's public transport system is expected to receive an extra 2.4 million Euros from the government. Passengers could begin enjoying cheaper travel at the start of the year if the government grants the anticipated sum. Most of the funds are expected to be used to improve and build circular rail routes. There are also plans to boost the number of security guards at rail junctions.

Let’s hope that this will be true because the cost of public transportation is so expensive that doesn’t excuse the name public transportation!

    
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Emanuel Paparella2008-08-12 10:30:29
On wiretapping: it's the old conundrum: we need sentinels to guard the gates of freedom but who will guard the sentinels? Nobody, unless freedom and human rights are understood by most people as transcendent values and not something granted, nobless oblige, by a powerful State with a powerful army.


AP2008-08-12 16:41:50
If you'll excuse me, what you call "remarkable will of the Finnish state", I consider actually as its obligation... and nothing so new in Europe. I mean, how many hundreds of children have been learning in Mandarin in London, Madrid or Lisbon, and for quite many years now? It's a good news nonetheless.


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