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Jane of Thought: Keep it fake Jane of Thought: Keep it fake
by Jane Eagle
2007-05-31 09:45:44
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It happens that many times people feel threatened by life even more than death. Because life - the mysterious woman that she is - secrets surprises, while the eternal, distant travel with Captain Death is a given end. Generally speaking, the confrontation of this soul-searching is the designing of a course, which we basically wish our life to follow. This “designing” is based on our dreams, needs and ambitions.

However, some ladies and gentlemen are afraid of future’s uncertainty one bit more and thus they skip the designing process and select an extraneous course of life to base up their tomorrows. Foreseeable, combatable, safe. So they set their models and let the imitation begin: Somebody's own a variety of influences - they may dress like a celebrity, speak like a politician, do the same job as their beloved literary hero.

Others have only one model… domineering their existence.

I give an example so that the conclusion will emerge:

In the female world I observe more Carrie/"Sex and the City"-copycats than…hmmm… Hillary Clintons. Both personalities are successful, beautiful, desirable, dynamic, self-reliant, troubled in the sector of relationships, with a difference to distinguish them: one is fictional, the latter’s real. And I ask myself, “Why’s there a quantitative difference?” You will answer me reasonably, “Because the New Yorker, emancipated, fashionable writer, is a more charming and interesting personality.” Well no… I disagree, this can’t be the difference. I mean Hillary is an aspiring first female planet leader, how cool is that? Cooler than any Samantha's orgasm!

My view? The difference lays in the difference: Fiction-Reality!

Television cultivates personas-caricatures, this is its nature - it would be impossible for it to attribute the totality of life. So it is sex, it is shoes, it is talking about sex and shoes, (simple and countable things, hmm?). The persons I picked for the comparison are symbolic to the syllogism, symbolic for fiction & reality. I don’t want to stick to the characters as much as to analyze the symbolism I use to give you an idea about what I roughly have in my head. Television brings to our attention fake personas daily. Female viewers are deceived that they’ll gain several assets by copying these TV pictures.

Furthermore, they believe that they determine their future that is refined with safety and certainty. Examples of “mass hysteria” would be Jennifer Aniston’s hair style combined with the character’s impulsive selfishness, Donna Reed’s (or Monica’s) fury of house cleaning along with her need of settlement, Carrie’s shoes along with her intimate relationship philosophy… Restless, little minds, hahaha! As it seems people can associate easier with a fake character than a real person. The life of Hillary is shadowed by a huge sex scandal which wasn't even her fault - yet she had to deal with it.

In a TV show however, as "Sex and the City", there’s always the necessity of the caricature element since its purpose is passing concrete, readable messages to the viewers. Therefore we finger count the factors that contribute to the show’s taglines: The thumb is for sex, the index is for New York, the middle one is for relationships, the ring finger for fashion, while the pinkie consists the various situations, which a girl is called to face (such as everyday / profession routine, maternity, health, family, comebacks of the past)… All in all is one hand.

Yet a human body in reality obtains one more hand, a torso, two legs and of course… a head. So tell me, what is easier to copy? Abortions, studies, routine difficulties do not exist to a great extent on the setting; each difficulty will be exceeded in the 30 minute episode and – the all-time classic datum - the protagonists never die. What is greatly significant though is that the success of a television idol springs from his/her physiognomy, which was created by the TV show agency. But the success of an individual springs of their psychic structure, work, public relations, and the concurrence of either fortunate or unfortunate events (all of which depict on his/her physiognomy).

Therefore, what do you think it could be harder, to try and resemble with a successful person or work in order to achieve the top? A good question now would be: “If so, why girls don’t try to look like Hillary?” Because she is real – we’ve already said - hence painful to achieve the exact picture since it’s complex, it is a picture that allocates depth. Who’s digging now man… when you can put on your manolos (that you bought with mummy’s money), create a blog to post your erotic adventures and just fly above the skies.

This article was originally written for my Greek blog, where many fellow bloggers disagreed with my stand. They claimed girls wanna be Carrie because she’s fascinating, plus the fiction factor has nothing to do with it. I tried to support my argument the best I could. Firstly I noted that I’m interested in the copying of a concept and not just for the adopting elements of someone’s personality (like Carrie’s extremeness in outfit choices). For example in order to look alike Carrie you’ll need sex + shoes + a blablablablog. I didn’t quit (not even for a pee break, hahaha) insisting that the difference is related with the fictional/authentic stuff.

Yet still I’m experimenting on the idea: Well… Stefanie Klein is an American blogger and writer, around 35 (I think – didn’t research on this, hehe), she’s got long, curly hair, is fashionable, popular, cute and raw as far as issues of Brazilian bikini or sex are concerned. Her female fanatics however follow processes “lookalikeness” with Carrie Br. and not Stefanie. At this time… Klein is working on launching a TV show with a heroine based on her memoirs. I’m guessing what the results of the experiment will be as soon as the show will air in America. We’ll have a new wave of “wannabe Stefanie "s. You need a “because”?

Ha, because after her personality demonstration the basic elements that compose her PICTURE in general will get crystallized, easy to read and learn by heart. Since the day I published this post I find myself truer and truer everyday. First I found this marvelous, astonishing video on YouTube directed by Andy Huang (I thought it speaks for me in such an arty way) and then I read a Stefanie Klein’s interview, where she said:

"I think I'm a bit of an animated spaz like Elaine (Benis), and I have the same hair and quirky mannerisms. People say I talk like her, the same cadences and facial expressions. As for SJP, it's more like a comparison to her character on "Sex & The City". I'd never have the nerve (or inclination) to wear half the things SJP did on set. I'm of course tired of the comparison.

At a certain point it works against you, always being compared to an old television show. You never knew on "Sex & the City" that any of the girls had family until a family member died. The show didn't address family, the importance of it in critical times. I believe in Straight Up and Dirty, I highlight how important my family was, particularly my father, in getting me through my hardest times, through divorce, abortion, and moving on.

HOWEVER, I recently watched a re-run of "Sex & The City", and it's a great, great show, so I guess I should be flattered. Though people need to remember, what I write is memoir, not FICTION. I write about my life, my sex life, my city life. New York. Austin. I believe whenever a cosmopolitan woman writes honestly about her life, she'll either be compared to 'Carrie Bradshaw' or 'Bridget Jones', both fictional characters. My stories are all real."

Yet Stefanie, for others it's been easier to feel fictional…

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Sand2007-06-01 10:11:21
Everybody learns by imitation. Whom you imitate, of course, is crucial. There aren't many models around today that appeal to me, or seem particularly creative. Somewhere, somehow, a spice of one's self creeps in and, with a bit of nurture, creates somebody interesting.


Jane E.2007-06-01 16:19:37
I couldn't agree more...


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