Ovi -
we cover every issue
newsletterNewsletter
subscribeSubscribe
contactContact
searchSearch
worldwide creative inspiration  
Ovi Bookshop - Free Ebook
Stop human trafficking
Ovi Language
Murray Hunter: Essential Oils: Art, Agriculture, Science, Industry and Entrepreneurship
WordsPlease - Inspiring the young to learn
Murray Hunter: Opportunity, Strategy and Entrepreneurship
International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
 
BBC News :   - 
iBite :   - 
GermanGreekEnglishSpanishFinnishFrenchItalianPortugueseSwedish
Eureka: Pecha-kucha on the new art of war Eureka: Pecha-kucha on the new art of war
by Akli Hadid
2018-07-30 06:46:20
Print - Comment - Send to a Friend - More from this Author
DeliciousRedditFacebookDigg! StumbleUpon

A pecha-kucha is a presentation where you have 20 slides and 20 seconds per slide. Since this is no power point presentation, I will discuss the new art of war in 20 chapters, and very brief notes on each chapter.

The chapters will deal with different aspects of fighting wars, and will be your brief guide to the art of war in the 21st century.

Conscription

pecha01_400Conscription can be mandatory, voluntary or enticed. In militarized societies conscripts are divided by height and weight and personality factors are not taken into account. In tribal societies conscripts are divided by tribe and get better treatment if their uncle or family member is a high-ranking military official. In free societies conscripts are divided by physical as well as personality attributes.

In militarized societies conscripts obey strict hierarchical chains of command and are beaten up if they don't follow the chain of command. In militarized societies conscripts bunch up by rank, and rarely talk to each other because the walls have ears. In tribal societies conscripts bunch up by tribe and region of origin, and tend to bully each other based on tribal or regional belonging. In tribal societies conscripts often have imaginary uncles who are generals. In free societies conscripts bunch up by personality compatibility and similarities in tastes.

Where armies get their funds

Military funds are a mixture of grants from local and foreign governments, grants from local or foreign financial markets, grants from local or foreign corporations, and grants from local or foreign households. Grants can be obtained freely, enticed or extorted. When given freely, grant givers tend to get protection in exchange. When enticed, grant givers may or may not be protected. When extorted, grant givers tend not to be protected.

Four types of armies

There are armies from failed states, armies from militarized states, armies from tribal states and armies from free states. Armies in failed states tend to have no guidelines and a random flow of information. Armies from militarized states tend to have strict guidelines and tend to have a highly ritualized flow of information where information is not always accurate. Armies in tribal societies tend to have vague guidelines and the information only flows within members of the same tribe, other tribes are kept in the dark. Armies in free societies have strict guidelines and ritualized but free and all inclusive flow of information.

Composition of an army

In free societies joint forces tend to consult with different branches which tend to be ground forces, navy, marines, air forces and coast guards. In tribal societies joint forces tend to communicate with select members of the ground forces, navy, marines, air force and coast guards. In militarized societies joint forces take every decision and ground forces, navy, marines, air force and coast guards implement those decisions, even when decisions don't fit the reality on the ground. In failed societies there is no clear chain of command or separation of forces.

Hierarchy and decision-making

In free societies lower-ranking soldiers make suggestions and higher ranking soldiers reject or second the suggestion. In tribal societies the leading tribe decides, and in cases where two tribes are leading a great deal of cacophony follows. In militarized societies higher-ranking members decide and lower-ranking members implement, in cases where there are two leaders there can be a great deal of cacophony. In failed societies everyone decides and implements.

Offense and defense

In free societies you attack to defend from a military threat. In militarized societies you attack to defend from a military, environmental, political, economic or social threat. In tribal societies you attack to defend against a military, political or social threat.

Small scale attacks and large scale attacks

In free societies you defend against small scale attacks and large scale attacks. In militarized societies you focus on small scale attacks. In tribal societies you focus and defend against large scale attacks. 

Military attacks and defense

In free societies politics, the economy and society tends to be none of your business and you focus on military attacks. In tribal societies you could defend and attack when there are perceived threats in politics, the economy or society. In militarized societies you attack when there's a perceived threat on the environment, on politics, on the economy or on society.

Legitimate defense and conflict spiral

In free societies only military threats justify legitimate defense. Political attacks, economic attacks or social attacks are just verbal attacks and can be defended with words and arguments, and you count on your people to have good judgment. In tribal societies verbal attacks against politicians, the economy or societies are perceived as military attacks and justify militarized defense. In militarized societies all verbal attacks are considered military attacks and can justify military action.

Environmental attacks and defense

In free societies, negotiations are held at the political level when environmental damage is caused to human beings on the short term or long term, or if environmental damage hurts businesses or the biological ecosystem. If political talks fail, military action can be considered. In militarized societies political or military action is only taken if environmental damage causes direct injury or death to human beings. In tribal societies, political or military action is only sought if environmental damage results in the direct death or a tribe member.

Political attacks and defense

In free societies, political and military action is only taken if there are physical threats on politicians or groups of politicians. The rest is resolved through negotiations. In militarized societies, military action or political sanctions can be sought if there are verbal or physical attacks against a politician or a group of politicians. In tribal societies, military or political action can be sought if verbal or physical violence or insult is used against the leading tribe, tribal symbols, or individual members of the tribe.

Economic attacks and defense

In free societies, political negotiations are held when there's an attack on the individual businesses or the economy at large, and if political action fails military action may be sought. In militarized societies military action can be taken if economic interests are damaged. In tribal societies, only tribal businesses or economies are protected against attack.

Social attacks and defense

In free societies, verbal attacks against society are tolerated. Only physical attacks against society at large are protected. In militarized societies, verbal attacks against society are not tolerated and can result in military action. In tribal societies, verbal attacks against the tribe are not tolerated and can result in military action.

Alliances

In free societies, military alliances are made with armies with compatible personalities, tastes and philosophy of life. In militarized societies, alliances are made with strong armies, and military officials pretend to share the same personalities, tastes and philosophy of life with those of free societies or tribal societies when alliances are needed. In tribal societies military alliances are rare and are only made if they share the interests of the tribe.

Dealing with multilateral organizations

Free societies make sure they talk first and don't care what order they talk. They have clear, consistent views on military action. Militarized societies make sure they talk last, and are often vague and ambiguous, often selfish in their views. Tribal societies tend to use speeches that are almost devoid of meaning.

Spies

Free societies use spies to evaluate military threats, environmental threats, political threats, economic threats and social threats and use them in preventative ways. Tribal societies only use tribal members as spies and can't contextualize threats out of their own beliefs and culture. Militarized organizations rank spies and lower-ranking spies do the dirty work while higher ranking spies do no work at all. In militarized societies spies communicate very little and their reports are often vague and inaccurate and often focus on attempts to demote high-ranking officials in foreign countries by revealing behavior that does not fit their rank.

Jackals

In free societies jackals only arrest those who cause a considerable threat the military, environmental, political, economic or social interests of the country. In tribal societies, jackals arrest, attack or kill those who offended the tribe. In militarized societies, jackals arrests, attack or kill those who offended people from the higher ranks. In tribal and militarized societies, jackals sometimes aim at members of the offending tribe rather than tribe members who engaged in the offensive behavior.

The armies

In free societies, every member plays a precise role and those members who can't fit in are locked in a closet where they are told to kill time before their service ends. In tribal societies members of the leading tribe are given a free pass while members of other tribes must be kept busy, even if that means digging holes in the morning and covering those same holes in the evening. In militarized societies, lower-ranking members are kept constantly busy by higher-ranking members, even if that means soldiers should take boxes out of the closet in the morning and put the boxes back to the closet in the afternoon.

The threat of war

In free societies, when military leaders discuss war, there's a possibility of war. In tribal societies, when the army suddenly starts being conscious, careful and deliberate in organizing the army, there tends to be a threat of war. In militarized societies, when a large number of soldiers are shifted around the army, there tends to be a threat of war.

The art of winning wars

Free societies tend to stop fighting and give up wars when the cause that started the war is no longer relevant. Tribal societies tend to stop fighting wars when the leading tribe decides to stop fighting, usually only to retreat and come up with a better game plan. Militarized societies tend to lose wars when higher-ranking officials lose their minds and take many useless risks.


     
Print - Comment - Send to a Friend - More from this Author

Comments(0)
Get it off your chest
Name:
Comment:
 (comments policy)

© Copyright CHAMELEON PROJECT Tmi 2005-2008  -  Sitemap  -  Add to favourites  -  Link to Ovi
Privacy Policy  -  Contact  -  RSS Feeds  -  Search  -  Submissions  -  Subscribe  -  About Ovi