Ovi -
we cover every issue
newsletterNewsletter
subscribeSubscribe
contactContact
searchSearch
Poverty - Homeless  
Ovi Bookshop - Free Ebook
Tony Zuvela - Cartoons, Illustrations
Ovi Language
Michael R. Czinkota: As I See It...
Stop violence against women
Tony Zuvela - Cartoons, Illustrations
International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
 
BBC News :   - 
iBite :   - 
GermanGreekEnglishSpanishFinnishFrenchItalianPortugueseSwedish
Laugh or cry? Laugh or cry?
by Asa Butcher
2007-03-26 10:27:21
Print - Comment - Send to a Friend - More from this Author
DeliciousRedditFacebookDigg! StumbleUpon

Back in February I remember reading an article on YLE about a ‘scuffle’ involving two North Korean diplomats who barricaded themselves on a train travelling from Moscow to Helsinki. They refused to present their credentials and violently resisted officials leaving the police no choice but to use force in order to restrain them. Today I read that North Korea has complained that…wait for it…Finland violated the human rights of the two men.

Are you laughing or crying? Yes, North Korea are complaining of human rights violations - Ovi magazine is now waiting to hear whether the Ku Klux Klan have announced Sidney Pottier as their new spokesman and when Iran will be hosting their first ‘Hooray for America’ week. At first I thought April Fools Day had arrived one week early or the word ‘complaining’ was a typo and should have been ‘committing’ but it appears that there is no joke.

To determine how outrageous the North Koreans claim is I performed a Google search using the following phrase: Humans rights in North Korea. The Google logorhythms chewed over the phrase, searched the millions of web pages and then produced this message: Are you joking? Ok, there were actually 19 million results but very few, let’s say none, featured the phrase in a positive light.

One of the first results is Wikipedia’s dedicated ‘Human right in North Korea’ page that is horrific reading, even for those who are aware of a fraction of what really takes place behind the closed doors of this totalitarian regime. “Citizens are not allowed to freely speak their minds and the government detains those who criticize the regime. The only legal radio, television, and news organizations are operated by the government…The use of political prison camps and torture to control the population is common and documented by many sources.” By the way, one of the many sources is a January 2006 report from Amnesty International.

Naturally North Korea strongly denies all reports of human rights violations and why shouldn’t they when it is merely their word against disreputable organizations (note sarcasm) such as the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights:

All-pervasive and severe restrictions on the freedoms of thought, conscience, religion, opinion and expression, peaceful assembly and association and on access of everyone to information, and limitations imposed on every person who wishes to move freely within the country and travel abroad.

This is just a fragment from the United Nation's Human Rights Resolution 2005/11 that refers specifically to North Korea and the full text will enrage even the most passive among you. There is a danger in this article that I will quote more and more examples of the extensive violations committed by North Korea dictators on its poor populace because the arrogance of those two diplomats to claim their human rights were…no I cannot write it again.

Emotional disgust is not usually an influence on my Ovi articles but today the complaint of these two North Korean henchmen has riled me…no, it has actually pissed me off. How dare they abuse the idea of human rights to divert attention from the fact they started a ‘scuffle’ – perhaps somebody should tell them that the world doesn’t play by the same rules as Pyongyang…thank god.


   
Print - Comment - Send to a Friend - More from this Author

Comments(2)
Get it off your chest
Name:
Comment:
 (comments policy)

Tony2007-03-26 23:52:47
I'm crying because it has now become a reflex defence to aggressively accuse a system or individual of human rights violations/racism/or sexism, simply to change the focus of the problem.

People in parliament now seem to live in fear of the politically correct and are seemingly unable to express their personal opinions because some lobby group will accuse them of an ...ism.


Rinso2007-03-27 08:55:55
Well said Tony. The political correctness movement is silencing people. Normal non-ism opinions are torn out of context and condemned. No wonder extreme parties are becoming more popular nowadays. (Which is not good either)


© Copyright CHAMELEON PROJECT Tmi 2005-2008  -  Sitemap  -  Add to favourites  -  Link to Ovi
Privacy Policy  -  Contact  -  RSS Feeds  -  Search  -  Submissions  -  Subscribe  -  About Ovi