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Saudi Arabia:  Still Lost in the Sands of War Saudi Arabia: Still Lost in the Sands of War
by Rene Wadlow
2017-04-04 10:37:28
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The aggression of the Saudi Arabia-led coalition (Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Qatar, Sudan, and the United Arab Emirates) against Yemen began on 24 March 2015 so that we can now mark its second anniversary. However there has been little progress toward a resolution of the armed conflict. Rather, there has been an increase in suffering, displacement of people, and destruction of the society. . Saudi Arabia has changed the name from “Operation Decisive Storm” to “Operation Restoring Hope”, probably on the advice of the public relations firm which advises the US Pentagon on the name of its operations.  The first 28 days in 2015 of bombing from the air of cities and camps, killing women and children, created a sand storm, but the results were in no way decisive.  Since that start on 24 March, at least a 4,600 people have been killed, many more wounded and many displaced within the country.  Nevertheless, the aggression has had little impact on the power configuration within the country.

yemen01_400_03The Association of World Citizens has constantly called attention to the violations of the minimum standards of the laws of war. There are international agreements which set humanitarian law and human rights standards in times of armed conflicts, mainly the Red Cross Geneva Conventions of 1949 written in the light of experience during the Second World War and the two Protocols to the Conventions written in 1977 in the light of experiences of the Vietnam War.  Not all States have ratified Protocols I and II, and a number of States have made reservations, especially refusing to forgo reprisals against civilians. Protocol I requires that attacks against military objectives be planned and executed so that “incidental” civilian injuries are not “excessive in relation to the specific military advantages anticipated”.  The decision-making is subjective on the part of the military, and military officers rarely see any action as “excessive” (1)

Another consequence of the bombing in Yemen is the starvation of the civilian population due to lack of food and water.  As a result of the widespread use of defoliants in the Vietnam War, there was written as Article 54 (2) of the 1977 Additional Protocol I, a prohibition to destroy foodstuffs, crops, drinking water installations and irrigation works.  Yemen is, at the best of times, short of food and drinking water installations.  The bombing has deliberately increased the hardship as well as increasing the number of displaced people with resulting lack of access to food and water.

The members of the UN Security Council looked at the situation, and then decided to look away, although the Council named a UN mediator to try to find a "political solution". The UN envoys to Yemen have had little influence on the promotion of a “political solution” or even any meaningful negotiations.  The first UN envoy, Jamal Benomar, resigned in frustration.  He has been replaced by Ould Cheikh Ahmed of Mauritania who had been earlier the UN humanitarian coordinator for Yemen and so knows the country and its many factions well. There is wide agreement in UN circles that Yemen is in a quagmire, with a free-fall of its economy, a collapse of its health services, its food imports blocked, and the country on the eve of division between north and south. The country's present form dates from 1990 when south Yemen (Aden) was more or less integrated into the north, but the country remains highly fractured on tribal, sectarian, and ideological lines, with tribal structures being the most important. In the best of worlds, one could envisage a federal Yemen with a rule of law.  More realistically, we can hope that autonomous tribal areas can be created that do not fight each other actively and allow necessary food imports and medical supplies into their areas.

Saudi Arabia, which should have known better, thought that it could expand its influence in Yemen.  The new King Salman with his son Mohammed as Defence Minister hoped for a quick victory, having an endless supply of modern military equipment from the USA, England and cooperation from the Gulf States. The memories of the Egyptian intervention with its heavy use of chemical weapons in the Yemen civil war of the 1960s was overlooked, both by Saudi Arabia and its close partner Egypt, although Egypt had lost some 20,000 soldiers at the time.

wc00One generation rarely learns from the experiences of earlier generations, and both Saudi's and Egyptians had hoped to advance their interests in Yemen's political confusion. Instead, Saudi Arabian leaders have been lost, blinded by the sands of war.  It is likely that the King and his son will never be trusted again. The aggression in Yemen was the first foreign policy effort of Saudi Arabia which had not been designed and directed by the USA − their first effort to walk alone.  The King and his son were lost in the sands of war and will never be heard of again on the international scene, but oil revenues will continue to assure the royal court of a comfortable life style.

The Association of World Citizens has proposed a four-step approach to the resolution of the armed conflict:

1) an immediate ceasefire ending all foreign military attacks;

2) humanitarian assistance, especially for hard-to-reach zones;

3) a broad national dialogue;

4) through this dialogue the establishment of a highly decentralized federal government.

In a 17 April 2015 letter to the then UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, the President of the Association of World Citizens wrote "It is imperative for the United Nation to be more effectively involved in ending the senseless aerial attacks and to establish a ceasefire, ensuring humanitarian and medical assistance to the people of Yemen. The critical situation is escalating and the humanitarian crisis in Yemen is approaching catastrophic dimensions"

            We can, alas, only repeat ourselves today.

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Notes

cf. D. Schindler and J. Toman. The Laws of Armed Conflicts  (Martinius Nihjoff Publishers, 1988)

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René Wadlow, President and a representative to the United Nations (Geneva)           Association of World Citizens

 


       
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