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Sanctuary Sanctuary
by Nikos Laios
2016-03-17 08:12:45
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Sanctuary

His hand slipped
Under her dress
Cupping her luscious
Delicate breast.

img_1501_ancient_sanctuary_400Fondling,
Bouncing,
Undulating
Vanilla skin;
Rolling nipple,
Delicious,tender
And ripe.

He nuzzled
In the valley
Of her breasts
Protectively
Like a welcoming
Harbour against
The evils of
The outside
World.

The ripped
Splinters and
Car bombs,shards
Slave bazaars;
The forgotten
People lost
At sea.

He felt
Warm and
Safe in her
Arms, as
Though he
Was entwined
In the very embrace
Of mother earth
Herself.

The
Fluttering
Butterflies
Like a golden crown
Floating around
Her flaxen hair;
Soft sweet alabaster
Talc scented thighs;
Silky fingers
Tenderly running
Through his hair.

His hand slipped
Under her dress
Cupping her luscious
Tender breast.

Fondling,
Bouncing,
Undulating
Vanilla skin;
Rolling nipple,
Delicious,ripe
And tender.

As the
World crashed
Around him;
The falling Dow,
The cracked and
Unused ploughs
Gathering rust
In howling dust,
In a hot searing sun
With the buzzards
Circling overhead

The blowflies;
Running red dye,
Dark fluorescent cries;
The severed heads
And wire-strings,
Captains crucified
On yellow desert
Sands.

Couched
In her soft,
Embrace,
He had all the
Wealth in the world.

A haven,a sanctuary
For his tired soul
As he nuzzled
Tenderly on her
Undulating breast;
Vanilla skin
Rolling nipple,
Delicious,tender
And ripe.

*************************************************************************

With a digital drawing from Nikos Laios



   
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Emanuel Paparella2016-03-17 15:15:35
This poem powerfully evokes, for me at least, the Old Testament’s Song of Songs where the intimate love of husband and wife is graphically described and portrayed as an analogy of the love of God for the soul; a far cry from the cold, abstract impersonal god of Aristotle as an idea. Indeed, eroticism (which can be portrayed by a mere glance even without lustful nakedness) may well be the only way to portray the interpersonal love of a God who is providential, cares for His creation and reveals Himself in Christ. That, together with the idea of charity as a cardinal virtue, is surely missing in the idea of god of an Aristotle or, for that matter, from the Puritan’s misguided misunderstanding of sex as a necessary Epicurean evil merely needed for procreation tricking us into it by its sheer pleasure.

The genius of the Old Testament is that it portrays a God who is much more than one’s abstract idea or conception to be worshiped (idolatrously as a product of one's mind); it portrays a God whose love is personal and intimate and unconditional inviting us to a relationship. Shestov may have had it on target all along in clearly distinguishing Athens from Jerusalem’s image of God.


Nikos Laios2016-03-19 12:59:07
Emanuel, give me ...give all of us a break!...my poem has nothing to do with monotheism,or for that matter with an invisible God or the love between husband and wife!

I wrote this poem as a celebration of humanism, of the power of the feminine side of our humanity and the nurturing love that women can give to heal this sick world of ours, of the pure power of human eroticism in a natural instinctual way that predates the strict backward moral cold dogma of Christianity , specifically of the power of the Mother Earth goddess archetype.

That intimidate moment between a man and a woman and the sanctuary that it can give a man,to heal a man's soul, and not some fictional cruel, cold and invisible God. That's the meaning and connotation that I as the poet of this piece have imbued in this poem, and have made no mention of God or the Old Testament at all here, my story in this poem is nothing other than the healing power of feminine love.

But somehow, you have miraculously found reference to chistianity and use every opportunity to project your religious views with a religious missionary zeal. All because in a recent symposium I took a critical review of religion in general and Christianity and specifically the Old Testament which you have taken personally, and where I professed my respect for the Olympian religious beliefs of my ancestors which I found are more natural than Christianity, and you are now using every opportunity to make pointed comments aimed at me.As I have said to you before, I like the symbolic mysticism in Christianity, but I also like the symbolic archetypes of many other religions,and as a Eueopean born into a humanist tradition, I choose my beliefs with my own personal freedom and wrap then unashamedly around man, for as Pythagoras once said, man is the measure of all things.

From now on if you have nothing positive to say about my poetry that does not involve a Christian religious angle, then please so not say anything at all and refrain from saying anything at all, as I - and I as I presume many other readers - are sick and tired of of your religious missionary zeal, for it does not behove well of an academic....


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