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Swedish report Swedish report
by Euro Reporter
2014-02-12 11:05:43
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Sweden holds plane passenger after 'bomb claim'

A man has been detained by Swedish police after trying to enter the cockpit on an Emirates flight from Dubai. Crew onboard the flight handcuffed the man during the flight and handed him over to police when the plane landed at Arlanda airport in Stockholm, police spokesman Albin Naverberg said.

Swedish tabloid Expressen reported the man began running through the plane, screaming he had a bomb, about an hour after departure from Dubai.  Passengers and staff wrestled him to the ground when he tried to gain entry to the cockpit, it reported. The man reportedly spent the remaining six hours of the flight lying on the floor in first class.

He was detained on suspicion of preparing aircraft sabotage after police had interviewed members of the crew. Mr Naverberg said police had no details of any explosives on the flight and declined to comment further.

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Afrophobic hate crimes on the rise

sweden_400Afrophobia, defined as hostility towards people with a background from sub-Saharan Africa, is soaring in Sweden, according to the researchers who compiled the government-commissioned report. They wrote on Monday in the opinion pages of the Dagens Nyheter newspaper (DN) that it was time society took these statistics seriously. Between 2008 and 2012, the number of reported hate crimes against Afro-Swedes, defined as anyone with African heritage living in Sweden, rose by 24 percent, while hate crimes in general during the same period decreased by six percent. Between 2011 and 2012 alone, the number of Afrophobic hate crimes rose by 17 percent, the researchers explained.

A prominent and recent example includes that of a 32-year-old Ghanian man who was attacked with his toddler son on a bridge in Malmö. The unprovoked incident was labelled a hate crime because the attackers used racial slurs as they dangled the man over the bridge. Sweden's African community is also discriminated against when it comes to housing and employment opportunities, the researchers noted. Sweden is currently home to an estimated 180,000 Afro-Swedes. Around 90 percent of them have roots in sub-Saharan Africa, with the remaining ten percent hailing from North and South America, and the rest of the world. Forty percent of Afro-Swedes were born in Sweden and have at least one parent from sub-Saharan Africa.

Researcher Samson Beshir said one of the reasons behind the spike in hate crimes was the dehumanization of Africans. "Take the portrayal of Africans in school material for example, Africa is only referred to as an object in connection with colonization," he told the TT news agency. The researchers called for several measures to break the trend and to put an end to Afrophobia in Sweden, including a state-funded investigation, an increase in public education about Sweden's role in the slave trade, and more generous compensation for victims of discrimination. Sweden's Integration Minister Erik Ullenhag agreed that the matter must be taken seriously. "I am especially concerned about the situation for the Somali-Swedes," he told TT. "This is the group that has been exposed to the most stereotypes in this debate during the past few years."

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'Immature banks jeopardize Sweden'

Borg told reporters on Thursday that the banks' continued high profits showed that they were "not mature enough to take their responsibility". “It’s a bit surprising that one chooses to go with larger dividends in a situation where we clearly have signalled that the banks need to have large core capital,” he told the media in Stockholm.

"It doesn't appear as though the banks have listened to the signals we've sent them," he added. "Therefore, the conclusion is that we have good reason to tighten regulations." Borg said he would take the matter up in the near future in meetings with the Swedish Financial Supervisory Authority and the central Riksbank bank. "(We will) decide how high our demands should be, what instruments we should use, and at what pace," said Borg, who believes the banks jeopardize the country's financial stability.

"What the banks are practically saying is that they are not adult when it comes to taking a societal responsibility in these questions," he explained. "Which means we cannot take them seriously when they say they will deal with this themselves." “We have to look after the interest of taxpayers,” Borg told Bloomberg. “We have a large banking sector, which constitutes a risk for the Swedish economy and Swedish taxpayers.”

 


       
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